Tag: 上海419龙凤

Two New COVID-19 Cases Reported Tuesday, Recoveries Continue To Increase

first_imgShare:Click to share on Facebook (Opens in new window)Click to share on Twitter (Opens in new window)Click to email this to a friend (Opens in new window) MGN ImageJAMESTOWN – Two new cases of COVID-19 were reported in Chautauqua County on Tuesday, as the number of recoveries continue to climb countywide.  Health officials say the new cases involve two men, one in his 60s and a another in his 80s.There is now a total of 77 confirmed cases, with 21 active.There are now two hospitalized cases of COVID-19, that number down two from Monday. Nine more patients have recovered from the virus, bringing the recovery total to 52.There are still 254 people that remain under quarantine or isolation orders by the Public Health Director and are being monitored. Officials say not all of those being monitored are confirmed to have COVID-19 but have either shown symptoms, are awaiting test results, or have risk factors.last_img read more

Sprint star Blake lashes IAAF chief Coe for ‘killing’ athletics

first_imgShare on: WhatsApp The 29-year-old Blake, who won 100m gold in the 2011 world championships, has had to settle with being the second fastest man behind countryman Usain Bolt in both 100m and 200m.But the two-time Olympic sprint relay gold medallist said he was confident of taking more gold in the 2020 Tokyo Olympics.“I’m always the favourite, the second fastest man in the universe. Everyone has to look up to me,” said Blake.“I think is going to be epic, this is the greatest show on earth and everyone is looking for that blue-carpet event, which is the 100m.“If you take Bolt away from the picture, I will be the fastest man in the world. I was born in the wrong time. Nevertheless, I am happy with what I have achieved.” New Delhi, India | AFP | Ace Jamaican sprinter Yohan Blake has slammed world athletics chief Sebastian Coe for taking away track and field disciplines such as the 200 metres from next year’s Diamond League.The International Association of Athletics Associations (IAAF) dropped the 200m, 3,000m steeplechase, triple jump and discus from its list of “core” disciplines at Diamond League meetings in 2020.“I believe all the events are very important. This is people’s careers, this is where they make their money,” Blake said at a promotional event in Mumbai on Monday.“If he can take away the 200 and triple jump, I don’t know if he is trying to build it or trying to kill athletics but that’s a stupid move. He must enhance the sport, but he is killing it. It is just madness.”The athletics world body said its decision was based on online research in China, France, South Africa and the United States and post-event surveys in Belgium, Britain and Switzerland.It said the aim was to reduce the length of the Diamond League meetings to fit a 90-minute international broadcast window.center_img FILE PHOTO: Yohan Blakelast_img read more

Monmouth Medical’s Children’s Hospital Named for Unterbergs

first_imgLONG BRANCH – In recognition of a significant gift from Ann and Thomas Unterberg to the Monmouth Medical Center Foundation, The Children’s Hospital at Monmouth Medical Center will be named The Unterberg Children’s Hospital at Monmouth Medical Center.Active philanthropists, the Unterbergs, residents of Rumson, New York City and Turks and Caicos, have been longtime supporters of Monmouth Medical Center. Ann currently serves as chair of the Monmouth Medical Center Foundation Board of Trustees and is the vice chair of Monmouth Medical Center’s Board of Trustees. Thomas is a past member Monmouth Medical Center’s Board of Trustees.The family’s long history of philanthropic support to Monmouth Medical Center includes previous naming opportunities – the Unterberg Pediatric Emergency Room, the Unterberg Learning Center and the Unterberg mammography suites in the Jacqueline M. Wilentz Comprehensive Breast Center.Ann and Thomas’ involvement with Monmouth Medical Center continues the legacy of generations of Unterberg family members who have supported the hospital, including Thomas’ parents, Clarence and Marjorie Unterberg. Marjorie Unterberg served as president of the School of Nursing at Monmouth Medical Center, where she established the Center for Nursing Excellence. She was also a former vice president of the Board of Governors at Monmouth Medical Center.“The Unterbergs generosity to Monmouth Medical Center will have a far-reaching impact in our community, benefiting our youngest patients and their families,” said Dr. Frank J. Vozos, president and chief executive officer of Monmouth Medical Center. “The board of directors, the board of trustees of the foundation, the hospital administration, the medical staff and all employees of Monmouth Medical Center express our deepest gratitude to the entire Unterberg family for their continued dedication to Monmouth Medical Center.”“The Unterbergs’ transformational gift to The Children’s Hospital will create an even more comforting environment to match our high-quality clinical care,” said Dr. Meg Fisher, chair of pediatrics at Monmouth and medical director of The Unterberg Children’s Hospital. “This gift will help us to continue providing exceptional pediatric care throughout the community.”“Ann and Thomas Unterberg are devoted to providing support to Mon­mouth Medical Center,” said Tara F. Kelly, vice president, Monmouth Med­i­cal Center Foundation. “Their continued support and commitment to the hospital and Foundation ensure that Monmouth can provide necessary care to our patients and community.”The Unterbergs’ gift will support the pediatric care provided by The Children’s Hospital at Monmouth Medical Center and allow for facility renovations, the refurbishing of patient areas to provide patients and their families with a more comfortable environment and the expansion of the pediatric intensive care unit, which serves hundreds of children each year.Ann has dedicated herself to philanthropy and nonprofit work for the past 25 years. In addition to her positions with Monmouth Medical Center and the Monmouth Medical Center Foundation, she serves as a trustee of the Two River Theater Company. In New York City, she is chair of Lincoln Center Education, as well as a trustee of both Lincoln Center for the Performing Arts and the International Women’s Health Coalition. She is on the Distribution Committee of the New York Community Trust, a $2.2 billion trust benefiting New York City’s nonprofits. Ann has served on numerous boards in New York and New Jersey, including The Wildlife Conservation Society, Grand Street Settlement, Planned Parenthood of NYC, Monmouth University, VNA of Central Jersey and the Garden State Performing Arts Center.Prior to her work in philanthropy, Ann worked at L.F. Rothschild, Unterberg, Towbin, a full-service investment banking firm. She is an honors graduate of Boston University.Thomas is a senior advisor at Diker Management, LLC in New York City and serves as chairman of the Investment Committee of Unterberg Technology Partners, a long-only securities fund. He has had distinguished career in investment banking, beginning in 1956, and is known worldwide as a pioneer in technology investment banking and an expert in emerging growth companies. Thomas has led more 200 initial public offerings, including the IPOs of Intel, Compaq Computers, Lotus, Tandem Computers, Cray Computer, Seagate Technologies, Conner Peripherals, Lin Broadcasting, Thermo Electron and AES Corporation. Additionally, he has been instrumental in the Israeli high-technology industry as investment banker of numerous IPOs and as a venture investor while serving as a director of Tamar Ventures. As a banker and advisor, Thomas has served on more than 30 corporate boards.Thomas has served as a trustee of many nonprofits, most notably Grand Street Settlement, where he recently retired as chairman after 40 years. He has served as a member of the Princeton University Investment Committee and currently serves on the board of the Two River Theater Company. Thomas holds a bachelor’s degree from Princeton University and a master’s degree in business administration from the Wharton School of the University of Pennsylvania.To learn more about ways to support Monmouth Medical Center, call Kelly at 732-923-6886 or visit www.monmouthfoundation.org.last_img read more

Matt Chapman extends hot streak, looks to Opening Day after final Japan exhibition

first_imgCLICK HERE if you are having a problem viewing the photos on a mobile deviceTOKYO — Matt Chapman may never want to leave the Tokyo Dome.Recording an out against the A’s third baseman has proven to be impossible over the A’s first two games in Japan. Chapman went 2 for 2 with a walk in Sunday’s night’s 6-6 exhibition draw with the Hokkaido Nippon-Ham Fighters. He reached base in all eight of his plate appearances over the A’s two exhibition games, looking every bit like the darkhorse MVP …last_img read more

New Young Ag Professionals leaders announced

first_imgShare Facebook Twitter Google + LinkedIn Pinterest Bennett and Liza Musselman of Orient are the new chaircouple of Ohio Farm Bureau’s State Young Ag Professionals Committee. Emily Krikke of Greenwich is the new vice chair.Young Ag Professionals are 18 to 35, singles and married, who are interested in improving the business of agriculture, learning new ideas and developing leadership skills. The group includes full- and part-time farmers, OSU Extension agents, teachers, consumer educators, former Ohio Farm Bureau Youth members, FFA and 4-H alumni, farm media communicators, livestock and equine enthusiasts, seed representatives, green industry employees, gardeners, foodies and more.The Musselmans farm with Bennett’s father. Liza is an accounting manager at WillowWood, owns a photography business and is active in Ohio Agri-Women and as a school volunteer. Bennett is a vice president and agribusiness banker at HeartlandBank, is president of Pickaway County Farm Bureau, on the ag committee of the Pickaway Competitiveness Network and a Pickaway County Farmers Club member. They have two sons.Krikke farms with her parents raising crops and hogs. She is a Certified Pediatric Registered Nurse at Akron Children’s Hospital. She is active in her county Farm Bureau and Ohio Pork Council.Other members of the State YAP Committee are Jessica and Nick Dailey, Kristen and Justin Dickey, Cassandra and Luke Dull, Casey and Charlie Ellington, Aaron Harter and Kaitlyn and Ross Meeker.last_img read more

10 months agoRoma chief Monchi admits interest in Genoa striker Piatek, but…

first_imgTagsTransfersAbout the authorPaul VegasShare the loveHave your say Roma chief Monchi admits interest in Genoa striker Piatek, but…by Paul Vegas10 months agoSend to a friendShare the loveAS Roma chief Monchi admits they’re interested in Genoa striker Krzysztof Piatek.However, he says they won’t consider the Pole at his current valuation.“Piatek? It would be possible if they didn’t ask for €70m,” Monchi told Gazzetta dello Sport.“For me he’s a good player, but he plays for Genoa. Tonali’s one of the best youngsters in Italian football, but I could say the same about Barella.“[Gianluca] Mancini? Right now it’s impossible, but in the summer it’s different. Rugani? Impossible, Juventus rejected a €40m bid from Chelsea and we can’t spend so much on a central defender.” last_img read more

11 days agoLeeds can compete against Man City with QSI – Radrizzani

first_imgTagsTransfersAbout the authorPaul VegasShare the loveHave your say Leeds can compete against Man City with QSI – Radrizzaniby Paul Vegas11 days agoSend to a friendShare the loveLeeds United could compete with Manchester City if proposed investment from the Middle East goes through, according to owner Andrea Radrizzani.Qatar Sports Investments, which owns Paris St-Germain, is one of three parties interested in the club.The company is run by Nasser al-Khelaifi, a friend of Radrizzani.The Italian said a Leeds fan based in America and the owner of an unnamed side in Italy were the other two keen to invest in the Championship club.”The option of Qatar Sports Investments and Nasser (al-Khelaifi) – first of all they are friends, we have had a good relationship for a long time,” Radrizzani told The Times.”They have the possibility to bring this club to compete with Manchester City, so for the fans that could be a fantastic opportunity.” last_img read more

Vancouver to rake in 30 million in empty homes tax in first

first_imgVANCOUVER – The city of Vancouver’s new empty homes tax is expected to bring in $30 million in revenue in its first year.Vancouver Mayor Gregor Robertson said $17 million has already been collected from owners of almost 8,500 properties that were determined to be vacant or under utilized for at least six months of the year.“For those who didn’t rent their empty property and chose to pay the empty homes tax, I just want to say thank you for contributing to Vancouver’s affordable housing funding and making sure we can invest more in affordable housing,” Robertson said at a news conference Monday. “For those who did rent their empty homes, thank you very much for adding to the rental housing supply here in Vancouver. It’s desperately needed.”The tax is the first of its kind in Canada, requiring homeowners who do not live in or rent out their properties to pay a one per cent levy based on the assessed value of the home.Robertson said the tax was intended to address the city’s near-zero vacancy rate.The most recent figure from the Canadian Mortgage and Housing Corporation puts the city’s rental vacancy rate at 0.8 per cent, up slightly from the previous year, the mayor said.It’s unclear yet if the tax has increased the availability of rental accommodation, Robertson said, adding that the city is developing better data collection methods to monitor the impact of initiates like the tax more closely.The city previously said about 60 per cent of properties affected by the tax are condominiums.The tax on the properties where owners said their home was empty ranged from $1,500 to $250,000, Robertson said, noting the highest tax bill came from a $25-million home.The funds will support the city’s affordable housing initiatives and residents can provide feedback on exactly where the money should be spent.Robertson said increasing capacity at homeless shelters or adding to the city’s rent bank, which provides one-time interest-free loans to low-income residents in a financial crisis, are among the possible initiatives that could benefit.The median tax due is just under $10,000 and Robertson said anyone who doesn’t pay up will face fines and have the bill added to their property taxes next year.“Those who are not playing ball here and who are skirting the system, we will get you,” the mayor said.Nearly 99 per cent of homeowners completed an empty homes tax declaration.The tax cost the city $7.5 million to implement and annual operating costs for the first and subsequent years are pegged at $2.5 million.Audits are underway and the city said just under 1,000 complaints or disputes have been filed that need to be addressed in the coming months.Robertson said it will be up to city council to decide whether the tax is having the desired effect, and that will likely take a few years of data to determine.“I would say at this point it looks like some signs of success,” he said.—Follow @Givetash on Twitter.last_img read more

Manufacturers relieved dairy farmers angry in wake of NAFTA replacement deal

first_imgTORONTO – Canada’s automakers appear to be the big winners from a renegotiated trade pact between Canada, the U.S. and Mexico, while steel and aluminum makers and dairy producers have less to celebrate.The breakthrough deal reached Sunday night, that U.S. President Donald Trump said he plans to call the United States Mexico Canada Agreement, exempts a percentage of eligible auto exports from tariffs, one of the biggest wins in the new deal, said David Adams, president of Global Automakers of Canada.“One of the largest things is just having certainty now in terms of what the trading relationship is, and what the business environment is going to be going forward. Because business desperately needs certainty and uncertainty is anathema to getting things done.”The new deal makes enough Canadian auto exports tariff-free to be a de facto exemption, and gives hopes that metal tariffs could be reversed, said Frederic Bastien, an analyst at Raymond James in a note.“This a victory for Canada because that amount is actually well above what we currently send south of the border. That gives us confidence a side deal on Canadian steel and aluminum can also be reached before the new NAFTA is ratified.”The terms reached between the U.S. and Mexico on higher wage thresholds will also be positive for Canadian producers, said Unifor president Jerry Dias, who welcomed the deal.“The threat of capricious auto tariffs has been lifted, stabilizing future investment” said Dias in a statement.Prime Minister Justin Trudeau said in a press conference that the auto sector was a key priority in negotiations.“Protecting our auto industry was one of the core concerns that Canadians had about getting to a deal, and we’re glad to say that we have significant protections.”Steel and aluminum producers, however, came away disappointed with no deal in place to lift the tariffs the U.S. imposed on their products at the end of May.“Certainly disappointed because they didn’t agree on a solution on the 232 sanctions regarding aluminum and steel,” said Jean Simard, CEO of the Aluminium Association of Canada.United Steelworkers Canadian director Ken Neumann was more direct, saying Canada “sold out” steel and aluminum workers by not getting the 25 per cent steel tariffs and 10 per cent aluminum tariffs removed.“It appears Canadian steel and aluminum workers are among those being sacrificed in the concessions made by the Liberal government in this deal,” he said in a statement.Most critical of the deal was the dairy industry, which railed against expanded U.S. access to the domestic dairy market and the elimination of competitive dairy classes.Bruno Letendre, head of the association that represents Quebec’s milk producers, said the concessions are the equivalent of 13 days fewer production for his members.“We’ve been sacrificed,” he said in an interview. “There’s no doubt about that. Supply management has been sacrificed.”The measures will have a “dramatic impact” on dairy farmers and cause the industry to shrink, said Pierre Lampron, president of Dairy Farmers Canada, in a statement.Ontario and Quebec premiers criticized the dairy concessions as a bad deal for farmers, though Foreign Affairs Minister Chrystia Freeland said at a press conference Monday that they would be made whole.“Our supply managed producers will be fully compensated, because that is the fair thing to do,” she said without providing details on planned compensation.For the general manufacturing sector, the sentiment is one of relief, said Dennis Darby, president and CEO of Canadian Manufacturers & Exporters.“It removes that uncertainty that was hanging over the sector, in terms of our access to this North American market, in terms of the rules related to our integrated North American supply chain.”He said he hopes the aluminum and steel tariffs can be resolved shortly, but that the manufacturing industry didn’t lose anything in the new deal.“At a minimum we haven’t lost any ground. Versus a very unpredictable and protectionist U.S. administration, I think Canada did as well as it could.”Markets took the news of the deal in stride, with the S&P/TSX composite index closing 0.2 per cent higher while the loonie posted an average gain of 0.86 of a US cent than Friday.“The markets are reacting positively and with relief but they’re certainly not euphoric by any means. They’re happy but not delighted,” said Doug Porter, chief economist at the Bank of Montreal.The new trade pact is significantly better than an all-out trade war, but won’t be a game changer for Canadian growth, said CIBC chief economist Avery Shenfeld.“For the most part, this was a defensive deal for Canada,” he said in an interview.“We had a NAFTA deal that was working reasonably well so we will call it a win because we were able to retain the key parts of the existing NAFTA deal in terms of our access to the U.S. market.”The lifted uncertainty could be enough to prompt more business investment, said RBC senior economist Nathan Janzen in a note.“While it’s possible to conclude that the deal consists largely of tweaks to the old agreement, we believe reduced uncertainty about the U.S.-Canada trade relationship could prompt businesses to put more investment dollars to work and will support exports.”— With files from Linda Nguyenlast_img read more