Category: uytoobzrgdln

Golden Star Resources Limited (GSR.gh) Q32012 Presentation

first_imgGolden Star Resources Limited (GSR.gh) listed on the Ghana Stock Exchange under the Mining sector has released it’s 2012 presentation results for the third quarter.For more information about Golden Star Resources Limited (GSR.gh) reports, abridged reports, interim earnings results and earnings presentations, visit the Golden Star Resources Limited (GSR.gh) company page on AfricanFinancials.Document: Golden Star Resources Limited (GSR.gh)  2012 presentation results for the third quarter.Company ProfileGolden Star Resources Limited is a gold mining and exploration company which owns and operates the Wassa open-pit gold mine and Wassa underground mine in Ghana as well as a carbon-in-leach processing plant located near Tarkwa, Ghana. The gold mining company also has interests in the Bogoso gold mining and processing operation, Prestea open-pit mining operations and the Prestea underground development project located near Prestea, Ghana. Golden Star Resources Limited holds and manages interests in various gold exploration properties in Ghana and Brazil. Its headquarters are in Toronto, Canada. Golden Star Resources Limited is listed on the Ghana Stock Exchangelast_img read more

SFS Real Estate Investment Trust (SFSREIT.ng) 2018 Annual Report

first_imgSFS Real Estate Investment Trust (SFSREIT.ng) listed on the Nigerian Stock Exchange under the Property sector has released it’s 2018 annual report.For more information about SFS Real Estate Investment Trust (SFSREIT.ng) reports, abridged reports, interim earnings results and earnings presentations, visit the SFS Real Estate Investment Trust (SFSREIT.ng) company page on AfricanFinancials.Document: SFS Real Estate Investment Trust (SFSREIT.ng)  2018 annual report.Company ProfileSFS Real Estate Investment Trust is a close-ended Real Estate Investment Trust Scheme in Nigeria which pools funds for the primary purpose of investing in income-generating real estate. This includes residential homes, residential apartments, office blocks, shopping malls and warehouses. The Fund managers are dedicated to developing and/or acquiring high-quality stock of properties in select locations in Nigeria. They will also make opportunist investments in joint venture developments in partnership with reputable developers. Typically, the Skye Shelter Fund invests 75% in real estate and 25% is invested in real estate related investments such as mortgages, real estate backed securities and real estate related equities. This portion includes a 10% allocation to cash for liquidity purposes. The company head office is in Lagos, Nigeria. SFS Real Estate Investment Trust is listed on the Nigerian Stock Exchangelast_img read more

I’d invest £10k in these UK shares in a V-shaped recovery

first_img Image source: Getty Images. Enter Your Email Address I’m sure you’ll agree that’s quite the statement from Motley Fool Co-Founder Tom Gardner.But since our US analyst team first recommended shares in this unique tech stock back in 2016, the value has soared.What’s more, we firmly believe there’s still plenty of upside in its future. In fact, even throughout the current coronavirus crisis, its performance has been beating Wall St expectations.And right now, we’re giving you a chance to discover exactly what has got our analysts all fired up about this niche industry phenomenon, in our FREE special report, A Top US Share From The Motley Fool. I would like to receive emails from you about product information and offers from The Fool and its business partners. Each of these emails will provide a link to unsubscribe from future emails. More information about how The Fool collects, stores, and handles personal data is available in its Privacy Statement. Renowned stock-picker Mark Rogers and his analyst team at The Motley Fool UK have named 6 shares that they believe UK investors should consider buying NOW.So if you’re looking for more stock ideas to try and best position your portfolio today, then it might be a good day for you. Because we’re offering a full 33% off your first year of membership to our flagship share-tipping service, backed by our ‘no quibbles’ 30-day subscription fee refund guarantee. Our 6 ‘Best Buys Now’ Shares “This Stock Could Be Like Buying Amazon in 1997” Simply click below to discover how you can take advantage of this.center_img Click here to claim your copy now — and we’ll tell you the name of this Top US Share… free of charge! TomRodgers has no position in any of the shares mentioned. The Motley Fool UK has recommended dotDigital Group. Views expressed on the companies mentioned in this article are those of the writer and therefore may differ from the official recommendations we make in our subscription services such as Share Advisor, Hidden Winners and Pro. Here at The Motley Fool we believe that considering a diverse range of insights makes us better investors. Tom Rodgers | Wednesday, 12th August, 2020 See all posts by Tom Rodgers I’d invest £10k in these UK shares in a V-shaped recovery If you’d told other investors you expected a V-shaped recovery just a couple of weeks ago, you’d have been branded a simpleton. You might just have been hounded off social media as a blinkered optimist.But the state of the UK stock market means a V-shaped recovery is entirely possible. This scenario suggests we’ve already seen the lowest point of the FTSE 100, below 5,000 points.5G is here – and shares of this ‘sleeping giant’ could be a great way for you to potentially profit!According to one leading industry firm, the 5G boom could create a global industry worth US$12.3 TRILLION out of thin air…And if you click here we’ll show you something that could be key to unlocking 5G’s full potential…In this sequence of events, our portfolios will eventually bounce back to where they were pre-crash. So what would I invest in today?What a V-shaped recovery is notWe hear today the UK has fallen into the deepest recession in history. That’s a 20.4% hit to GDP from the coronavirus pandemic.But a V-shaped recovery doesn’t mean an immediate snap back to a rocketing stock market. It’s simply a sustained recovery from the depths of a sharp economic decline.Central banks and governments desperately want to avoid an L-shaped recovery. That would mean persistently high unemployment over many years. It would mean no return to growth for perhaps half a decade.Economic stimulus in the form of hundreds of billions of pounds from the Bank of England is all to avoid this state of affairs.What a V-shaped recovery isMost investors don’t like to buy undervalued UK shares in a crashing market, even if a V-shaped recovery is on the cards. But this is precisely where you can make the biggest gains of your investing life.Especially if you can avoid trendy fads and focus on FTSE 100, FTSE 250 and AIM market strength.Remember Warren Buffett’s mantra: “Be fearful when others are greedy and greedy when others are fearful.”What if you had bought £10,000 of FTSE 100 insurer Aviva at the bottom of the March crash? You’d be sitting on 27.5% gains in less than six months. That’s a handy capital appreciation of £2,750. Something any private investor would be happy to have essentially for free.What I’d invest £10k in nowA strong selection of the finest UK shares come to mind when I think about how I’d invest several thousand pounds.From the FTSE 100, I’d be looking at either BP or Royal Dutch Shell. I think both will gain strongly from this low point as demand for oil returns to the world.I recommended FTSE 250 B&Q owner Kingfisher as the best share for June 2020 and I think it will continue its stonking 117% rise over the last three months of the year. Home improvements have proved exceedingly popular since lockdown and I see this trend continuing across Europe, where Kingfisher owns top DIY stores.From among the UK’s smaller companies I’d pick £390m market cap Dotdigital. Its bosses told the market this month that the business would see minimal impact from Covid-19. And its share price has hit recent all-time-highs. Profits, revenues, and earnings per share are all rising year over year. With a price-to-earnings growth ratio of just 0.4, it remains undervalued to my mind. In fact, I see DOTD continuing its stellar rise whether there’s a V-shaped recovery or not.last_img read more

Malawi churches unite to promote better management

first_img Rector Washington, DC TryTank Experimental Lab and York St. John University of England Launch Survey to Study the Impact of Covid-19 on the Episcopal Church TryTank Experimental Lab Africa, Join the Episcopal Diocese of Texas in Celebrating the Pauli Murray Feast Online Worship Service June 27 Featured Jobs & Calls AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to PrintFriendlyPrintFriendlyShare to FacebookFacebookShare to TwitterTwitterShare to EmailEmailShare to MoreAddThis Anglican Communion, Course Director Jerusalem, Israel Featured Events Submit an Event Listing By Frank JomoPosted Aug 16, 2012 Virtual Episcopal Latino Ministry Competency Course Online Course Aug. 9-13 Episcopal Church releases new prayer book translations into Spanish and French, solicits feedback Episcopal Church Office of Public Affairs Malawi churches unite to promote better management Virtual Celebration of the Jerusalem Princess Basma Center Zoom Conversation June 19 @ 12 p.m. ET Rector Bath, NC Press Release Service Rector Shreveport, LA Curate Diocese of Nebraska Rector Martinsville, VA Rector Knoxville, TN Assistant/Associate Rector Morristown, NJ Episcopal Migration Ministries’ Virtual Prayer Vigil for World Refugee Day Facebook Live Prayer Vigil June 20 @ 7 p.m. ET Youth Minister Lorton, VA Rector Hopkinsville, KY Rector/Priest in Charge (PT) Lisbon, ME Remember Holy Land Christians on Jerusalem Sunday, June 20 American Friends of the Episcopal Diocese of Jerusalem New Berrigan Book With Episcopal Roots Cascade Books Tags The Church Pension Fund Invests $20 Million in Impact Investment Fund Designed to Preserve Workforce Housing Communities Nationwide Church Pension Group Priest Associate or Director of Adult Ministries Greenville, SC Submit a Job Listing Director of Administration & Finance Atlanta, GA The Church Investment Group Commends the Taskforce on the Theology of Money on its report, The Theology of Money and Investing as Doing Theology Church Investment Group center_img An Evening with Presiding Bishop Curry and Iconographer Kelly Latimore Episcopal Migration Ministries via Zoom June 23 @ 6 p.m. ET Canon for Family Ministry Jackson, MS An Evening with Aliya Cycon Playing the Oud Lancaster, PA (and streaming online) July 3 @ 7 p.m. ET Family Ministry Coordinator Baton Rouge, LA This Summer’s Anti-Racism Training Online Course (Diocese of New Jersey) June 18-July 16 Director of Music Morristown, NJ Inaugural Diocesan Feast Day Celebrating Juneteenth San Francisco, CA (and livestream) June 19 @ 2 p.m. PT Priest-in-Charge Lebanon, OH In-person Retreat: Thanksgiving Trinity Retreat Center (West Cornwall, CT) Nov. 24-28 Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Hires Reverend Kevin W. VanHook, II as Executive Director Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Rector Pittsburgh, PA [Ecumenical News International, Blantyre, Malawi] Several Christian denominations in Malawi, including Anglicans, Presbyterians and pentecostals, have established an organization to help improve management, financial and administrative skills of churches in the southern African nation.It is called the Institute of Church Management and was initiated by concerned church members, according to a statement from the group. Its members include active and retired clergy, church elders and laity.“The Church in Malawi has provided unprecedented evangelistic and social development services over the years. However, the concerned church members noted various administrative and management challenges being faced by most churches and church related organizations. This has resulted in ineffective and inefficient delivery of their services,” reads the statement.The group aims to improve management and administrative skills in churches and church related organizations through training, consultancy and research. The group is led by retired Anglican Archbishop for Central Africa Bernard Malango.“The vision of the ICM is to achieve effective, efficient, transparent and accountable church management,” said the group which also has Malawi’s former president Justin Malewezi and the Deputy Governor of Malawi’s Central Bank Mary Nkosi as trustees.It will provide training on church administration and management such as corporate governance, strategic planning, financial management, human rights, conflict management and HIV/AIDS management. It will also provide consultancy services in order to evaluate, assess and analyse church administration and management and it will research church related issues in order for the church to make informed decisions and actions. Rector Albany, NY Assistant/Associate Rector Washington, DC Rector and Chaplain Eugene, OR Seminary of the Southwest announces appointment of two new full time faculty members Seminary of the Southwest Curate (Associate & Priest-in-Charge) Traverse City, MI Missioner for Disaster Resilience Sacramento, CA Bishop Diocesan Springfield, IL Assistant/Associate Priest Scottsdale, AZ Associate Priest for Pastoral Care New York, NY Rector Tampa, FL Ya no son extranjeros: Un diálogo acerca de inmigración Una conversación de Zoom June 22 @ 7 p.m. ET Associate Rector for Family Ministries Anchorage, AK Associate Rector Columbus, GA Rector Belleville, IL Rector Collierville, TN Rector (FT or PT) Indian River, MI Rector Smithfield, NC Ecumenical & Interreligious Cathedral Dean Boise, ID Submit a Press Releaselast_img read more

Q&A: This Episcopalian cultivates community by getting dirty

first_img Rector Tampa, FL January 5, 2018 at 12:16 am Brian – We’d love to have you come! We have a pruning workshop in early March and a grafting workshop and scion wood exchange on March 24. come on a Friday in the summer and join our weekly community garden potluck. Pat Munts says: Brian Sellers-Petersen says: Tags Episcopal Relief & Development, Rector Washington, DC Q&A: This Episcopalian cultivates community by getting dirty Brian Sellers-Petersen leaves Episcopal Relief & Development after 17 years to focus even more on his agrarian ministry. Ya no son extranjeros: Un diálogo acerca de inmigración Una conversación de Zoom June 22 @ 7 p.m. ET Associate Priest for Pastoral Care New York, NY Rector Albany, NY Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Hires Reverend Kevin W. VanHook, II as Executive Director Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York January 3, 2018 at 4:31 pm What a great article on a great person. It’s been a pleasure to have worked with Brian for the last 13 years, and his new dimension and direction is truly exciting to see for the Church with a big “C” and all of our local congregations. Keep up the great work BS-P. Rector Pittsburgh, PA January 3, 2018 at 5:42 pm Bravo, Brian!!! Your work is awesome!!! Dan Tootle says: Dave Baylor says: Course Director Jerusalem, Israel January 3, 2018 at 9:26 pm Brian – We need to talk about farming and food security education in Haiti. Please let me know how to communicate with you. The Church Pension Fund Invests $20 Million in Impact Investment Fund Designed to Preserve Workforce Housing Communities Nationwide Church Pension Group Director of Music Morristown, NJ Featured Jobs & Calls Church-Community Agriculture, P.J. Cabbiness says: January 8, 2018 at 7:21 am We are a tiny congregation (less than 20!) with the most land (7 acres) out of the 3 Episcopal churches in town. We have talked for years about having a garden, but the excuse of “not enough volunteers” has always stopped us. It’s time to begin our work. Thank you! We’ll manage somehow….one Dixie cup at a time. January 4, 2018 at 5:51 am Great job, my old friend! Priest-in-Charge Lebanon, OH Ann Symington says: This Summer’s Anti-Racism Training Online Course (Diocese of New Jersey) June 18-July 16 Submit a Press Release Assistant/Associate Rector Washington, DC Featured Events Nell Gustafson says: January 3, 2018 at 9:42 pm Dan, You (and anyone else) can reach me at [email protected] Brian Sellers-Petersen Susan Bravo says: Rector Martinsville, VA Seminary of the Southwest announces appointment of two new full time faculty members Seminary of the Southwest Brian Sellers-Petersen says: Family Ministry Coordinator Baton Rouge, LA January 3, 2018 at 4:13 pm Small scale, hands-on urban agriculture is critically important and there is wisdom in this approach to the environment. Missioner for Disaster Resilience Sacramento, CA Virtual Celebration of the Jerusalem Princess Basma Center Zoom Conversation June 19 @ 12 p.m. ET Rector Smithfield, NC January 4, 2018 at 11:07 am Rich blessings to you, friend! Rector Knoxville, TN January 4, 2018 at 11:59 am Pat Munts, I recently learned about your orchard. I would love to head over to see the orchard and meet you and figure out ways to collaborate. I now have kids and a grandchild in your diocese – on the opposite side of Spokane (Roslyn). I’m also a WSU Master Beekeeper apprentice and a Master Gardener dropout. Go Cougs! [email protected] The Church Investment Group Commends the Taskforce on the Theology of Money on its report, The Theology of Money and Investing as Doing Theology Church Investment Group Rector/Priest in Charge (PT) Lisbon, ME New Berrigan Book With Episcopal Roots Cascade Books Remember Holy Land Christians on Jerusalem Sunday, June 20 American Friends of the Episcopal Diocese of Jerusalem January 4, 2018 at 1:13 pm Hurray, Brian!! I have bought several of your books and have passed them around! That’s what will make his ministry grow person to person. Being an avid gardener myself I know you are on the right track! Gardening builds Community, deeper understanding of God and faith in ways few things can. An Evening with Presiding Bishop Curry and Iconographer Kelly Latimore Episcopal Migration Ministries via Zoom June 23 @ 6 p.m. ET Brian Sellers-Petersen works in a garden in the spring 2016. He’s retiring from Episcopal Relief & Development to continue his food and faith ministry in other ways. Photo: Kevin C. Johnson/St. Mark’s Cathedral, Seattle[Episcopal News Service] As 2017 came to a close, Episcopal News Service caught up with Brian Sellers-Petersen during a brief visit to the Episcopal Church Center in midtown Manhattan. Sellers-Petersen spoke about how his ministry has evolved, his near-death experience and what he plans to do in 2018 now that he’s moving on after 17 years working for Episcopal Relief & Development. Hint: One catalyst was his book, “Harvesting Abundance: Local Initiatives of Food and Faith,” published by Church Publishing Inc.Sellers-Petersen is based in Seattle, Washington. For the last several years, he worked as senior advisor to Robert Radtke, president of Episcopal Relief & Development. Sellers-Petersen’s favorite way to engage people is through his fusion of food and faith. For example, he was integral in founding the Faith Farm and Food Network at the Beecken Center of The School of Theology at Sewanee in Tennessee. In August 2016, the program’s name changed to Cultivate: Episcopal Food Movement.What is the connection between edible gardens and the Episcopal Church? The church owns a lot of land — land not being used. We’re huge property owners. … A lot of my work interests run parallel with asset-mapping work. So, I was talking to churches about their asset base. And in suburban, upper-middle class churches, there are multiple master gardeners and gardens, peopleBrian Sellers-PetersenHome: Seattle, WashingtonEducation: University of Minnesota-Twin Cities, B.S.; Fuller Theological Seminary, M.A., theology; The University of the South, fellowship at School of TheologyPositions: Director of the Center for South Africa Ministry at All Saints Episcopal Church in Pasadena, California; California regional organizer for Bread for the World; special assistant to the president at World Vision; senior advisor to the president, Episcopal Relief & Development.knowledgeable about landscaping, ornamentals. Yet a lot of [experts] are moving toward edible gardens. There’s also an abundance of commercial kitchens in our churches that aren’t used to their maximum, or even minimum capacity, as far as I’m concerned.Why didn’t you go directly into farming like your family did?My family is the first generation off the farm. We were the city kids of all the cousins, [the ones] who came down in the summer and worked on the farm. We were the kids without a farmer tan and calluses. My parents, they’ve never really came right out and said it, but they couldn’t wait to get off the farm. So, there wasn’t encouragement of my interest in agriculture. I mean, I remember distinctly thinking about going to [agriculture] school in Nebraska, where the family farms are. I don’t know if I ever told my parents that, but they would’ve probably convinced me that wasn’t the right thing to do because it’s a really hard life.What did you do instead?I went into international development. When I graduated, I had a psych degree, and I didn’t know what to do. I … ended up in South Africa. That was as far away from Nebraska and Minnesota as I could get. I was there during apartheid, at the end of it. I worked in rural areas and kept that connection with the land. I worked for Bread for the World, which is a Christian citizen lobbying group focused largely in the farm belt and on anything hunger related. And then I worked at World Vision, and I developed curriculum for kids and worked in a similar job to what I’m doing at [Episcopal Relief & Development].How did your work at Episcopal Relief & Development take a turn toward food in particular?Whenever I’d make international trips, I’d look and really study and learn as much as I could about the agricultural work — small-scale, sustainable agriculture. When I headed up the church engagement department at [Episcopal Relief & Development], we started the curriculum for children called the Abundant Life Garden Project.It was viewing the garden as a classroom, where children could learn about what Episcopal Relief & Development does in terms of food, water, environment and livestock, and also, they could learn the basics of Christianity. To me … the garden is the best classroom we have to learn about God. And that’s what this curriculum was about.Out of the experience of seeing all that work around the world, I started looking at church assets in the United States completely differently. Churches had beautiful green lawns, a lot of them. And then I started seeing those green lawns and saying, ‘You know, that acre of land that they don’t use, except for the Easter egg hunt, could be growing food.’ We need to develop a stronger sense of awareness of how important it is to be eating local and seasonal food. … The church is the place to help lead in terms of awareness.Brian Sellers-Petersen displayed copies of his book and some of the honey from his hives after a recent Sunday service in December. Photo: Kevin C. Johnson/St. Mark’s Cathedral, SeattleWhat instigated your “Harvesting Abundance” book and career change?Five years ago, I got sabbatical from Episcopal Relief & Development. I took a deep, deep dive looking at church agriculture here in the United States. I volunteered at this biodynamic permaculture hippie farm not far from my house once a week. And I visited a lot of church gardens and talked to people and listened to what made them glad. It was a blast. I went way beyond parishes. All the other entities within the church have agriculture, and some of them were founded on agriculture. The University of the South, Sewanee, used to be a working farm, all the students had to work on the farm. And there’s a separate high school, St. Andrew’s, that a monastic order founded, where again, all the students had to work on the farm. … Camps and conference centers are another example. Gardens are growing all over the place.Then what happened? Not long after that, I almost died. I spent four months in the hospital. There’s about a 10 percent survival rate [for people diagnosed with aortic dissection]. So, I just learned about gratitude. I was immobilized, so I had a lot of time laying on my back. I never really understood the depth to which I had gone until I was out of the hospital. I had to relearn everything. I had to learn how to swallow again.How did this traumatic event change the course of your life?I had a lot of time to consider, and so during that period, I started finally documenting my sabbatical, and it ended up becoming a book. The process of writing the book led me to the decision that it’s time, after 17 years with [Episcopal Relief & Development], to try something different.And so, this is how you’ve integrated your faith with your love of all things agrarian?I’m called to put my hands in the dirt, but not eight hours a day, 10 hours a day, 12 hours a day. Maybe occasionally, but my call is more to be an agricultural evangelist in the Episcopal Church, sharing the good news of our responsibility to care for all of creation. The presiding bishop really has articulated that well, in terms of creation care. I want us to do a better job in our choices around food and caring for all of creation, and that happens in a variety of ways.Such as, how we can do our part to alleviate climate change?When we talk about building resilience against climate change, a kitchen garden is a pretty simple way to do it, instead of feeling paralyzed. Every carrot we pull out of our backyard or off our little balcony, if we grow on our balcony, is one less carrot where we drive our car to the grocery store to buy a carrot that’s been shipped from somewhere else. And by extension, farmers markets are vitally important.I have a chapter in my book about churches with farmers markets. I think it’s a great way of participating in the community. … If a church wants to do a garden, if at all possible, put it in the most conspicuous spot on your property. Plant it in your front yard. That serves as a symbol of your values. I think that gardens can serve as invitations. They can serve as porches. They may even serve as a front door.Why is food considered a ministry?I look at [the church’s current mission priorities] and all of them can connect to food. I look at reconciliation work: A garden is a great equalizer. The common table, if you can stay off of divisive subjects while at the table and enjoy food together, it really brings people together. And I think that’s an important ministry.Evangelism: Not in a coercive way, but I think there’s good news in all aspects of food ministry.Church growth, reinvigoration and church planting: There’s another story in there about a new church … really using the growing of their garden as a metaphor for growing their church.And, the Navajoland [Area Mission] is doing some remarkable farming and small business enterprise through their agrarian ministry. So, in terms of indigenous ministries within the church, they’re doing it.Do you have a garden at home?Yeah, it’s kind of a wild garden. Since I’ve been sick, I haven’t spent as much time on it as I’d like. And since I started keeping bees, the bees have taken more of my time. But my wife is the big-time gardener. We’ve had chickens for many years, but our last chicken got out of the coop.Considering himself a bee evangelist, Brian Sellers-Petersen keeps bees in four places: his hives at home in Seattle, Washington, at St. James and St. Columba’s churches in Kent, Washington, and on the roof of St. Mark’s Cathedral and diocesan office in Seattle. Photo: Kevin C. Johnson/St. Mark’s Cathedral, SeattleWhat are you going to do now that you’re not working for Episcopal Relief & Development?I’m still trying to figure out how it all pieces together. It is largely going to be surrounding food ministry. Growing food. Preparing food, eating food. Spirituality of food.Basically, I’m hanging up my shingle. I’ve been in conversation with a number of groups both inside the church and a couple of government agencies and nonprofits in Seattle. My hope is to continue to work within the church to encourage better stewardship of our land. [As of Jan. 2, Sellers-Petersen has joined the Vandersall Collective, a New York-based consulting firm that serves churches, faith-based organizations and other nonprofit entities. Vandersall has worked with St. Lydia’s Dinner Church and Not Churchy worshipping community both in Brooklyn.]Is there any kind of action that you’d like people to take after reading this?Churches should be doing their own composting. I’ve come across a lot of great composting systems that churches have developed. But we’re [not even doing well] at just recycling. We’ve got to walk before we run. So, we can talk about the big things such as insulation and solar panels, but there are the small things too.Get our kids’ hands in the dirt at Sunday school when they’re preschoolers, to put a radish seed in a Dixie cup so they can see the sprout next week. There could be huge transformations from these very little things. Sunday school kids … put the seed in, which ends up at the food bank, that ends up in people’s balconies or backyards, and these people might even live in a food desert. And the kid can follow that food chain from a young age and learn about that.Cultivate, one of their big jobs is to make sure this [grow-your-own trend] isn’t just a fad. We’re at this sort of this critical place where if we don’t hop on it hard now, we’re in big trouble.Start a conversation in your churches about what your assets are. What can you do, small or large? Sometimes people get overwrought and think it’s too much, and they collapse in on themselves — “Oh, we can’t do it. We don’t have enough volunteers.” Sometimes it’s just planting a seed.— Amy Sowder is a special correspondent for the Episcopal News Service and a freelance writer and editor based in Brooklyn. She can be reached at [email protected] This interview was edited for clarity and condensed. Luke Fodor says: Leon Spencer says: Submit a Job Listing AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to PrintFriendlyPrintFriendlyShare to FacebookFacebookShare to TwitterTwitterShare to EmailEmailShare to MoreAddThis In-person Retreat: Thanksgiving Trinity Retreat Center (West Cornwall, CT) Nov. 24-28 Rector and Chaplain Eugene, OR Rector Shreveport, LA Rector Bath, NC Director of Administration & Finance Atlanta, GA Inaugural Diocesan Feast Day Celebrating Juneteenth San Francisco, CA (and livestream) June 19 @ 2 p.m. PT Join the Episcopal Diocese of Texas in Celebrating the Pauli Murray Feast Online Worship Service June 27 Press Release Service Assistant/Associate Rector Morristown, NJ Submit an Event Listing Bishop Diocesan Springfield, IL Cathedral Dean Boise, ID Rector Belleville, IL Rector Hopkinsville, KY TryTank Experimental Lab and York St. John University of England Launch Survey to Study the Impact of Covid-19 on the Episcopal Church TryTank Experimental Lab Pat Munts says: Comments are closed. Comments (12) Assistant/Associate Priest Scottsdale, AZ January 3, 2018 at 10:33 pm Brian, I am part of the Episcopal Church of the Ressurection in Spokane WA. We have restored a 70+ year old apple orchard on our property and joined forces with the Spokane Edible Tree Project, a gleaning organization that harvested 8000 + pounds of fruit last year and 6000 this year. We also have a one acre community garden on the site. Professionally I am the small farm and urban agriculture coodinator for WSU Spokane County Extension and work with commuity gardens, urban agriculture and small scale farmers. How can I get involved in what you are doing? Curate Diocese of Nebraska Curate (Associate & Priest-in-Charge) Traverse City, MI Youth Minister Lorton, VA Rector Collierville, TN Associate Rector for Family Ministries Anchorage, AK Rector (FT or PT) Indian River, MI Priest Associate or Director of Adult Ministries Greenville, SC Associate Rector Columbus, GA By Amy SowderPosted Jan 3, 2018 Episcopal Migration Ministries’ Virtual Prayer Vigil for World Refugee Day Facebook Live Prayer Vigil June 20 @ 7 p.m. ET Food and Faith Canon for Family Ministry Jackson, MSlast_img read more

British Charities “deeply disappointed” with airlines’ reaction

first_img Two British charities are coming to terms with the news that British Airways and Virgin Atlantic are opposing their suggestion that airline passengers who were victims of a price fixing conspiracy should be able to choose to donate their refunds to charity. Similarly, suggestions that unclaimed refunds should be donated to these good causes have been rejected, meaning that BA and Virgin may still profit from illegal surcharging.Both airlines have agreed to refund up to £73.5 million to UK passengers who bought tickets between August 2004 and March 2006 when an illegal fuel surcharge was being levied. However, whereas refunds unclaimed by US passengers will be assigned to an American good cause “Miracle Flights for Kids,” no such legal remedy is being offered on this side of the Atlantic.Speaking on behalf of the British Disabled Flying Association, one of the charities involved, Chairman Mike Miller-Smith said:“We are deeply disappointed that the airlines have reacted in the way they have. This was a perfect opportunity for them to demonstrate goodwill on their part. The logic seems flawed, flagship British companies giving money to charity in the US, yet refusing to do the same in the UK.”David Philpott, Chairman of the Association of Air Ambulance Charities, the other not-for-profit organisation involved said:“The airlines have already set this money aside to make restitution, so we find it somewhat unfortunate that they should oppose this humanitarian intervention. In the case of British Airways, one has to ask who is advising them, since a good news story would do them no harm right now.”Both Mr Miller-Smith and Mr Philpott will now attend the Northern California District Court on 25th April, where they will ask the judge to intervene in their favour.***ends***Notes to Editors:The British Disabled Flying Association (BDFA) was founded in 1993 to provide education, recreation and leisure time activities for disabled persons by providing opportunities with the object of improving the conditions of life. Last year the BDFA gave over 200 disabled or terminally ill adults and children their first experience at the controls of a light aircraft, typically improving self esteem and feelings of achievement with associated therapeutic benefit.www.bdfa.netContact: Mike Miller-Smith 01256 346424The Association of Air Ambulance Charities (AAAC), an umbrella not for profit organisation with 13 member charities, exists to support the work of the UK’s independent air ambulance charities. The charities collectively undertake 19,000 missions in a year and serve 177 Accident and Emergency Departments. The combined budgets of the AAAC charities is approximately £ 19.4 million.www.airambulancecharities.co.ukContact: David Philpott 01622 833833  23 total views,  1 views today AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to TwitterTwitterShare to FacebookFacebookShare to LinkedInLinkedInShare to EmailEmailShare to WhatsAppWhatsAppShare to MessengerMessengerShare to MoreAddThis Howard Lake | 17 April 2008 | News Tagged with: corporate Law / policy British Charities “deeply disappointed” with airlines’ reaction About Howard Lake Howard Lake is a digital fundraising entrepreneur. Publisher of UK Fundraising, the world’s first web resource for professional fundraisers, since 1994. Trainer and consultant in digital fundraising. Founder of Fundraising Camp and co-founder of GoodJobs.org.uk. Researching massive growth in giving. AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to TwitterTwitterShare to FacebookFacebookShare to LinkedInLinkedInShare to EmailEmailShare to WhatsAppWhatsAppShare to MessengerMessengerShare to MoreAddThislast_img read more

Efforts Ongoing to Address Looming Water Level Crisis on Mississippi River

first_img By Gary Truitt – Nov 22, 2012 SHARE Home Indiana Agriculture News Efforts Ongoing to Address Looming Water Level Crisis on Mississippi River SHARE Facebook Twitter Efforts Ongoing to Address Looming Water Level Crisis on Mississippi River The waterways industry continues to pursue action that would trigger a directive from the president, and ASA will monitor and support the efforts to prevent a significant disruption of barge traffic on the Mississippi River, especially during this peak period of soybean shipping. Over the past several days, Senate and House members have sent letters to the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers raising concerns with the impending impact that low water levels will have on barge traffic on a portion of the Mississippi River. The Senate letter, led by Sen. Tom Harkin (D-Iowa) and Sen. Roy Blunt (R-Mo.) was signed by 15 senators. The House letter, led by Rep. Aaron Schock (R-Ill.), was signed by 62 members of the House of Representatives. Contacts made by soybean farmers and organizations, including ASA, were successful in building the number of senators and representatives that signed onto the letters. Both letters, addressed to Assistant Army Secretary Jo-Ellen Darcy, stated concerns over possible disruption of Mississippi River navigation and urged immediate action to prevent the river’s closure. Facebook Twitter In addition to the letter, Senate staff also met with officials from the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers to discuss the situation. The Corps continues to maintain that it cannot expedite work on removing rock pinnacles or alter the planned reduction in water flows from the Missouri River without a directive from President Barack Obama or a legislative directive from Congress. Previous articleA Day to Give ThanksNext articleNew USFRA Survey: Americans Say Food Production In Right Direction, Widespread Misperceptions Remain Gary Truittlast_img read more

Mayor’s son gets suspended sentence for brutal attack on two journalists

first_imgNews Respect judicial independence in cases of two leading journalists in Serbia and Montenegro, RSF says Receive email alerts March 30, 2021 Find out more The press freedom organisation added: “As a mayor, Mugosa is a government official and journalists must be able to follow his movements in public without being exposed to any form of violence. We welcome the fact that the police are investigating the actions of the mayor’s son but we think the mayor’s conduct should also be investigated.” RSF_en Montenegro : RSF and other leading press freedom organisations condemn the continued judicial persecution of Jovo Martinović “We are surprised by this violent behaviour, which is incompatible with a public office,” Reporters Without Borders said. “By acting in this manner, the mayor is encouraging others to think violence against the press if legitimate. If he really thought he was being followed or threatened, as he claims, he should have alerted the police, who could have intervened and reassured him that the two men were journalists.” Forum on Information and Democracy 250 recommendations on how to stop “infodemics” MontenegroEurope – Central Asia In a press release yesterday, the mayor denied deliberately attacking the two journalists and said he thought he was being followed by two men seen hiding behind bushes. Claiming he felt he was being attacked and therefore had a right to defend himself, he said he stood by his actions. Help by sharing this information Follow the news on Montenegrocenter_img Pejovic was hit by the mayor’s son, sustaining an injury to the face, as he was photographing the mayor getting into a badly-parked car outside a café owned by the son. Jovovic was attacked and beaten, sustaining bruises and a cut to the ear, when he tried to prevent the mayor from hitting Pejovic. Organisation July 24, 2012 – Updated on January 20, 2016 Mayor’s son gets suspended sentence for brutal attack on two journalists MontenegroEurope – Central Asia June 7, 2021 Find out more November 11, 2020 Find out more News News Reporters Without Borders deplores the six-month suspended jail sentence that Miljan Mugosa, a son of Podgorica’s mayor and currently a foreign ministry employee, received from a Podgorica court on 23 July for a physical attack on Mihailo Jovovic, the editor of the daily Vijesti, and photographer Boris Pejovic in August 2009.“We regard the sentence as exceedingly lenient given the brutality of Mugosa’s attack and the position he held at the time,” Reporters Without Borders said. “The appeal court should impose an exemplary sentence in order to render justice to these two journalists. We will pay close attention to the way the appeal goes.”The case has taken three years to come to trial. In the attack that took place in Podgorica on 5 August 2009 (see the press release below), Mugosa hit Pejovic in the face and perforated Jovovic’s ear drum, which had to be operated on.Mayor Miomir Mugosa, who was present during the attack and who is held responsible by the two journalists, appeared in court during the trial but only to testify as witness.——————————————————————————–Journalists assaulted by capital’s mayor, son and bodyguard7 août 2009Reporters Without Borders condemns a physical attack on Mihailo Jovovic, the editor of the daily Vijesti, and photographer Boris Pejovic on 5 August in Podgorica by the city’s mayor, Miomir Mugosa, his son Miljan and one of his bodyguards. News to go furtherlast_img read more

Register for Descanso Discoveries Camp by April 1 and Save

first_img faithfernandez More » ShareTweetShare on Google+Pin on PinterestSend with WhatsApp,Virtual Schools PasadenaHomes Solve Community/Gov/Pub SafetyPASADENA EVENTS & ACTIVITIES CALENDARClick here for Movie Showtimes Herbeauty10 Questions To Start Conversation Way Better Than ‘How U Doing?’HerbeautyHerbeautyHerbeauty10 Vietnamese Stunners That Will Take Your Breath AwayHerbeautyHerbeautyHerbeauty6 Strong Female TV Characters Who Deserve To Have A SpinoffHerbeautyHerbeautyHerbeauty12 Most Breathtaking Trends In Fashion HistoryHerbeautyHerbeautyHerbeauty7 Things A Man Will Do Only If He Really Loves YouHerbeautyHerbeautyHerbeauty15 Countries Where Men Have Difficulties Finding A WifeHerbeautyHerbeauty Community News Subscribe Top of the News Make a comment Pasadena’s ‘626 Day’ Aims to Celebrate City, Boost Local Economy 7 recommended0 commentsShareShareTweetSharePin it First Heatwave Expected Next Week Name (required)  Mail (required) (not be published)  Website  EVENTS & ENTERTAINMENT | FOOD & DRINK | THE ARTS | REAL ESTATE | HOME & GARDEN | WELLNESS | SOCIAL SCENE | GETAWAYS | PARENTS & KIDScenter_img Home of the Week: Unique Pasadena Home Located on Madeline Drive, Pasadena More Cool Stuff Community News Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked * Business News Descanso Gardens will partner with Child Educational Center to present two weeks of summer camp for children entering grades 1-7. Children will tend to their own garden plot, prepare healthy snacks in the outdoor kitchen, and investigate the wonders of our natural world through art and science-based activities.Free extended care available. $481 per week, with early bird pricing available until April 1.For more information/registration contact (818) 354-3418 or ceconline.org.Download the CEC Summer Exploration Camps brochure here. Childrens events Register for Descanso Discoveries Camp by April 1 and Save From STAFF REPORTS Published on Wednesday, March 9, 2016 | 6:56 pm Get our daily Pasadena newspaper in your email box. Free.Get all the latest Pasadena news, more than 10 fresh stories daily, 7 days a week at 7 a.m. Pasadena Will Allow Vaccinated People to Go Without Masks in Most Settings Starting on Tuesday last_img read more

JPL: Building Blocks of Life’s Building Blocks Come from Starlight

first_img The dusty side of the Sword of Orion is illuminated in this striking infrared image from the European Space Agency’s Hershel Space Observatory. This immense nebula is the closest large region of star formation, situated about 1,500 light years away in the constellation of Orion. Image credit: JPL-CaltechLife exists in a myriad of wondrous forms, but if you break any organism down to its most basic parts, it’s all the same stuff: carbon atoms connected to hydrogen, oxygen, nitrogen and other elements. But how these fundamental substances are created in space has been a longstanding mystery.Now, astronomers better understand how molecules form that are necessary for building other chemicals essential for life. Thanks to data from the European Space Agency’s Herschel Space Observatory, scientists have found that ultraviolet light from stars plays a key role in creating these molecules, rather than “shock” events that create turbulence, as was previously thought.Scientists studied the ingredients of carbon chemistry in the Orion Nebula, the closest star-forming region to Earth that forms massive stars. They mapped the amount, temperature and motions of the carbon-hydrogen molecule (CH, or “methylidyne” to chemists), the carbon-hydrogen positive ion (CH+) and their parent: the carbon ion (C+). An ion is an atom or molecule with an imbalance of protons and electrons, resulting in a net charge.“On Earth, the sun is the driving source of almost all the life on Earth. Now, we have learned that starlight drives the formation of chemicals that are precursors to chemicals that we need to make life,” said Patrick Morris, first author of the paper and researcher at the Infrared Processing and Analysis Center at Caltech in Pasadena. Community News Subscribe 0 commentsShareShareTweetSharePin it Get our daily Pasadena newspaper in your email box. Free.Get all the latest Pasadena news, more than 10 fresh stories daily, 7 days a week at 7 a.m. Home of the Week: Unique Pasadena Home Located on Madeline Drive, Pasadena Name (required)  Mail (required) (not be published)  Website  Community News More Cool Stuff Herbeauty5 Things To Avoid If You Want To Have Whiter TeethHerbeautyHerbeautyHerbeautyInstall These Measures To Keep Your Household Safe From Covid19HerbeautyHerbeautyHerbeauty11 Signs Your Perfectionism Has Gotten Out Of ControlHerbeautyHerbeautyHerbeautyThe Most Heartwarming Moments Between Father And DaughterHerbeautyHerbeautyHerbeauty15 Beauty Secrets Only Indian Women KnowHerbeautyHerbeautyHerbeautyPretty Or Not: 5 Things You Didn’t Know About BeautyHerbeautyHerbeauty Pasadena Will Allow Vaccinated People to Go Without Masks in Most Settings Starting on Tuesday center_img Make a comment Top of the News Pasadena’s ‘626 Day’ Aims to Celebrate City, Boost Local Economy Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked * Business News EVENTS & ENTERTAINMENT | FOOD & DRINK | THE ARTS | REAL ESTATE | HOME & GARDEN | WELLNESS | SOCIAL SCENE | GETAWAYS | PARENTS & KIDS First Heatwave Expected Next Week faithfernandez More » ShareTweetShare on Google+Pin on PinterestSend with WhatsApp,Virtual Schools PasadenaHomes Solve Community/Gov/Pub SafetyCitizen Service CenterPASADENA EVENTS & ACTIVITIES CALENDARClick here for Movie Showtimes Science and Technology JPL: Building Blocks of Life’s Building Blocks Come from Starlight From JPL-Caltech Published on Wednesday, October 12, 2016 | 6:14 pmlast_img read more